Tech in a Madrid Café in 2003

Madrid Café 2003
Madrid Café 2003

This is what I used for on-the-go tech in 2003 sitting in a café in Madrid. A Psion 5mx and a brick Nokia mobile phone  The Psion had a great form factor that had a keyboard that was just big enough for touch-typing and small enough to fit into a jacket pocket. It also had the wonderful benefit of being distraction-free. 

Not forgetting the camera, a Canon Powershot S30. A remarkably pocketable device for the time. 

Riga Airport

In transit between Helsinki and Bern. Grey day outside. Riga has a small but functional airport. Found a nice cafe with a spare power socket. Free wifi but it keeps showing adverts every second minute.

Air Baltic seem like the Ryanair of Northern Europe. Sneaky charges for checking in and a couple of staff who have horrible customer service skills. Can’t forget that horrible woman in at the check-in in Vilnius airport that I dealt with a couple of years ago. It was by far the worst checkin experience I have had so far.

 

Norwegian airlines now offers direct weekend flights between Helsinki and Dublin all year round. #aerlingus #norwegian #helsinki #dublin

I was searching for a flight home yesterday and was surprised when hipmunk found a direct flight between Helsinki and Dublin. When I saw it was offered by Norwegian Airlines, I headed to kayak.com as they offer a tool for looking up direct flights from any airport. In addition to the usual Aer Lingus schedule (Saturday and Tuesday), I saw that Norwegian offer direct flights on Friday and Monday which is much more sensible for a weekend break. I personally prefer this schedule and have already booked an extra trip with Norwegian. I wonder why the schedule planning team in Aer Lingus couldn’t have offered what the city break consumer wanted on the Dublin- Helsinki route?

The Wild Atlantic Drive

Nice idea to develop this route along the west coast of Ireland. The Irish Times is going to have someone travel the route and write about it every day.

Take the existing coastal road up and down the western seaboard between Derry and Cork, a route of some 1,400km, develop it, package it and market it to visitors – from abroad and other parts of Ireland. The trick is to do it by taking what is there already – remote and wild beauty, coupled with people who in the main are warm and friendly and have a vibrant culture and history – and draw people into it without compromising it.