The next hacks are coming from the browser

I was reading this article on Tom’s Guide about how some Twitter accounts were exposed.
What was startling to me was that Chrome and Firefox store passwords in plain text. Eye opening for me. I used them a lot until I got a Lastpass subscription.

The upshot is that you should never let your web browsers save login credentials for important accounts, such as social networking, bank or other online financial accounts, webmail or online retail accounts such as Amazon.

Chrome and Firefox store login credentials in plain text, making them ripe targets for hackers. Internet Explorer, to Microsoft’s credit, stores then in encrypted form in a separate application.

If remembering passwords is a pain, use a dedicated password manager, such as LastPass or Dashlane, that encrypts and protects your passwords much more securely than a web browser can. And don’t forget to enable two-factor authentication on every account that allows it.

Reducing product and enhancing result in design

Fanstastic post by Goran Peuc in Smashing Magazine about design in information products.

Some highlights are mentioned below but read the whole article.

One of the main problems in product design:

I still find a lot of products today, be they digital or physical, to be too complex and feature-driven. Shouldn’t we as designers instead be looking to remove complexity for users as much as possible or as much as allowed for by current technology, by making our products fit more seamlessly into their daily lives and routines? I feel that we simply don’t and, more worryingly, that we still haven’t learned lessons from the past.

The desired process:

Figure out a way to remove such complexities. Figure out how to remove entire pieces of your product or interface, while keeping the user on the path to the desired result.

Finally:

Theoretically, the ultimate goal for any product is to be completely removed from the user’s perspective. Work towards that goal because nobody wants to use your product.
People just want the benefit of using it.

10 year anniversary of the blog

It’s ten years since I started this blog. Guess what? Yes, I’m moving to another new hosting company.

Most of the work has been done today and I waited for this blog to transfer over before writing this post. Most websites are wordpress based. Moving them is straightforward, ftp down, ftp up, sql export, sql import, change server settings.

Have a great 2016!

Backup all of your photos on Flickr

I read about an update an update to the Uploadr tool from Flickr. In the past, this tool has been cumbersome and inefficient. However, this new tool is working very well for me so far. I just pointed it at an external drive and it’s working well so far. It is possible to view photos by date uploaded or by date taken which extracts the exif information from the photo.

Unfortunately, I used some terrible photo editing tools in the past and in many photos, that information is wiped.

So now I’m on the hunt for a good tool that can batch update exif date information. So far, apart from a couple of command line options, I haven’t found anything.

The photos are all uploaded to private mode so only you will see them. If your computer or backup option goes wrong, this is one option that can help.

Download the new Uploadr here

This page explains the tool and how it works in more detail.

Flickr Uploadr is finally here

Google changes search engine to prioritise mobile friendly sites

I got an email from the Google Webmaster Tools Team in relation to one of my old sites.

Google systems have tested 204 pages from your site and found that 99% of them have critical mobile usability errors. The errors on these 202 pages severely affect how mobile users are able to experience your website. These pages will not be seen as mobile-friendly by Google Search, and will therefore be displayed and ranked appropriately for smartphone users.

Now I have to update this old site. I feel it is a good time to implement some current technologies like angular.js and jquery with it and maybe some others. But this is really a tipping point in the supremacy of sites being ready for mobile devices above normal computers and laptops.

CMS Wire has more detail here about the change.

It’s possible to test a site for mobile friendliness using this link.

Mapping the world

I love this article, a neat and practical way of developing the world in which we live.
http:// http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/oct/06/missing-maps-human-genome-project-unmapped-cities

Whether the goal is to prevent cholera or crime, Missing Maps is a crucial first step. For much of the developing world, our current digital maps may as well say ‘Here there be dragons.’ There’s a long way to go, but someone has at last picked up a sword.

Irish now on Duolingo

Duolingo which is a fantastic language learning tool (I have it on my phone). It’s perfect for short bursts of brushing up on a language in small 10 minute sessions.

Now, I just found this post on Reddit that they have added Irish.

It’s still in beta so it can only be used on your computer. Once, it has come out of beta, it will be available on the mobile app.
Cool!

Who is this site for?

 Seth Godin comes up with a set of crucial questions for those businesses that have a website.

 

  • Who is this site for?
  • How did they find out about it?
  • What does the design remind them of?
  • What do you want them to do when they get here?
  • How will they decide to do that, and what promises do you make to cause that action?

I put it here because I want to remember it. Perhaps you will like it too.