Backup all of your photos on Flickr

I read about an update an update to the Uploadr tool from Flickr. In the past, this tool has been cumbersome and inefficient. However, this new tool is working very well for me so far. I just pointed it at an external drive and it’s working well so far. It is possible to view photos by date uploaded or by date taken which extracts the exif information from the photo.

Unfortunately, I used some terrible photo editing tools in the past and in many photos, that information is wiped.

So now I’m on the hunt for a good tool that can batch update exif date information. So far, apart from a couple of command line options, I haven’t found anything.

The photos are all uploaded to private mode so only you will see them. If your computer or backup option goes wrong, this is one option that can help.

Download the new Uploadr here

This page explains the tool and how it works in more detail.

Flickr Uploadr is finally here

Flickr just announced one terabyte of space for every user!

Very interesting coming one day after they announce the acquisition of Tumblr and their promise not to screw it up. The look and feel of the site has also been updated and places all of the focus on the images. I wonder how this will affect the pro model that they use?

The BBC reports

“It puts Flickr back on the agenda making it relevant to both hobbyist and professional photographers alike, but it also reignites the whole storage capacity war that started with Gmail and that we are now seeing with cloud file sharing services.”

Google offers users a total of 15GB of free storage across its core cloud services. Facebook does not impose such a limit but downgrades the quality of high-resolution photos.

Instagram Conditions and the new Flickr app #Instagram #Flickr

I haven’t used Instagram a lot for sharing photos although I do like going through the photos of my contacts. Today they announced they updated their terms and conditions which has resulted in the internet going crazy. One of the best posts I read was on Business Insider.

If you want to stop social networking services from exploiting your likeness for advertising, you’ve got to start paying up.

Within the article, a reference was made to a post last year from the founder of pinboard.in which basically boiled everything into “Don’t be a free user”.

So stop getting caught off guard when your favorite project sells out! “They were getting so popular, why did they have to shut it down?” Because it’s hard to resist a big payday when you are rapidly heading into debt. And because it’s culturally acceptable to leave your user base high and dry if you get a good offer, citing self-inflicted financial hardship.

So where does that leave everyone? Well, there is an alternative that offers a paid option for enhanced membership. Co-incidentally, they also added a new app this week that rivals Instagram in design and surpasses it in interoperability with other sites.Yes, it’s Flickr. Nice that they include a post clarifying the ownership and rights of photos

In fact, when you upload to Flickr you set the kind of license that you want to apply to the photos, ‘All Rights Reserved’ is the default, or you can select one of the many flavors ofCreative Commons licenses. The choice is yours and you maintain control over how your photo can be used by others. If you want to make your photo available for use by everybody in the world, license it using Getty Images, or to license it to a fancy magazine, it’s up to you..

New version of Flickr App

New version of Flickr iOS App copies Instagram.

Marissa Mayer is taking action on revitalising Yahoo with this update to the Flickr App. Is it soon enough? Let’s see but the app looks good!

Unlike Instagram, Flickr provides support for Twitter, in addition to Facebook, Tumblr, and email.

Smart move in expanding the reach of the to as many other portals as possible.

How Flickr was murdered

Gizmodo has a fascinating article about what went wrong at Flickr and Yahoo’s failure in general to enhance all of those cool startups they bought in the late 2000’s.

This is the story of Flickr. And how Yahoo bought it and murdered it and screwed itself out of relevance along the way.

The lesson is clear – if you want your acquisition to continue to grow, concentrate on continued innovation first and corporate integration second. I see parallels with Oracle and all of the industry-leading companies (Siebel, Peoplesoft, etc) they bought. For corporate integration in Yahoo’s case read Fusion in Oracle’s.

The site that once had the best social tools, the most vibrant userbase, and toppest-notch storage is rapidly passing into the irrelevance of abandonment. Its once bustling community now feels like an exurban neighborhood rocked by a housing crisis. Yards gone to seed. Rusting bikes in the front yard. Tattered flags. At address, after address, after address, no one is home.

It is a case study of what can go wrong when a nimble, innovative startup gets gobbled up by a behemoth that doesn’t share its values. What happened to Flickr? The same thing that happened to so many other nimble, innovative startups who sold out for dollars and bandwidth: Yahoo.

Here’s how it all went bad.

I used to be quite active but I haven’t posted in months and visited in weeks. Interestingly, the last image I posted was an Instagram shot.
Iced bike
Read the full article here